As a quantitative ecologist with the Sierra Nevada Group at Point Blue, I work mainly on designing monitoring projects and analyzing field data. Recently I have paid particular attention to methods that can correct for the imperfect detection of monitoring targets (typically referred to as “occupancy models”). At Point Blue we rely on these methods as a means to generate robust metrics of bird abundance and distribution across time and geographical scales to track the ecological effects of climate change, land management, and other environmental stimuli. I am also active in the ongoing Region 5 National Forest land management plan revision process, taking part in numerous public dialogues.  

My work prior to coming to Point Blue in 2009 had been mainly in the forests of the Great Lakes region where I focused on using bird surveys and forest inventory tools to inform large-scale land management. I grew up in northern Michigan where my family owns and actively manages some property covered in Jack pine forest, and this is where I developed an interest in the interplay between human land-use and ecological systems. I completed an M.S. in 2002 at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay (Environmental Science and Policy), and a PhD in 2008 at Michigan State University (Fisheries and Wildlife).

I work at the Point Blue headquarters in Petaluma, but take every available opportunity to travel to the Sierras or to the Point Reyes National Seashore.

Featured Work:

Sierra Nevada Avian Monitoring Information Network