Ecology, Climate Change and Related News

Conservation Science for a Healthy Planet

Doubling of coastal flooding frequency within decades due to sea level rise

Leave a Comment

Sea level rise will double coastal flood risk worldwide

Small but unstoppable increases will double frequency of extreme water levels with dire consequences, say scientists

Guardian UK May 19, 2017

….The rise of 5-10cm, likely to occur within a couple of decades, would mean major cities including San Francisco in the US, Mumbai in India, Ho Chi Minh in Vietnam and Abidjan in Ivory Coast facing a doubled risk of coastal floods. “The maps of increased flooding potential suggest a dire future,” write the scientists.

This study shows how even small changes in mean sea level can significantly increase the frequencies with which critical thresholds are exceeded,” said Thomas Wahl, professor of coastal risks at the University of Central Florida, who was not part of the research team.

For coastal communities that means they need to adapt in order to prevent flood events from happening much more often,” Wahl said. “In the end, however, it still needs more localised studies in order for coastal managers to make important decisions on the ground.”

Scientific Reports Publication:

Doubling of coastal flooding frequency within decades due to sea-level rise

Sean Vitousek,,Patrick L. Barnard, Charles H. Fletcher, Neil Frazer, Li Erikson & Curt D. StorlazziScientific Reports 7, Article number: 1399 (2017) doi:10.1038/s41598-017-01362-7   Published online:

Abstract: Global climate change drives sea-level rise, increasing the frequency of coastal flooding. In most coastal regions, the amount of sea-level rise occurring over years to decades is significantly smaller than normal ocean-level fluctuations caused by tides, waves, and storm surge. However, even gradual sea-level rise can rapidly increase the frequency and severity of coastal flooding. So far, global-scale estimates of increased coastal flooding due to sea-level rise have not considered elevated water levels due to waves, and thus underestimate the potential impact. Here we use extreme value theory to combine sea-level projections with wave, tide, and storm surge models to estimate increases in coastal flooding on a continuous global scale. We find that regions with limited water-level variability, i.e., short-tailed flood-level distributions, located mainly in the Tropics, will experience the largest increases in flooding frequency. The 10 to 20 cm of sea-level rise expected no later than 2050 will more than double the frequency of extreme water-level events in the Tropics, impairing the developing economies of equatorial coastal cities and the habitability of low-lying Pacific island nations.

View all articles

Comments are closed