Ecology, Climate Change and Related News

Conservation Science for a Healthy Planet

2017 was the second-warmest year on record per NASA; Trend continued even without El Niño, which helped make 2016 the hottest.

Leave a Comment

January 18 2018 by James Hansen[a], Makiko Sato[a], Reto Ruedy[b,c], Gavin A. Schmidt[c], Ken Lo[b,c], Avi Persin[b,c]  Read full article here

Fig. 1. (a) Global surface temperatures relative to 1880-1920 based on GISTEMP data, which employs GHCN.v3 for meteorological stations, NOAA ERSST.v5 for sea surface temperature, and Antarctic research station data[1].

Fig. 1. (a) Global surface temperatures relative to 1880-1920 based on GISTEMP data, which employs GHCN.v3 for meteorological stations, NOAA ERSST.v5 for sea surface temperature, and Antarctic research station data[1].

———–

From NOAA:

For more information

View all articles

Comments are closed