Ecology, Climate Change and Related News

Conservation Science for a Healthy Planet

Living in a fire-adapted landscape: Priorities for watershed resiliency in Sonoma County’s natural and working lands

Leave a Comment

February 12 2018 Living in a Fire-Adapted Landscape

In the wake of the North Bay fires, the Sonoma County Board of Supervisors directed the Sonoma County Ag + Open Space District to convene a coalition of organizations and agencies to identify short-term actions for watershed recovery and long-term strategies for watershed resiliency. This Watershed Collaborative included the active engagement and participation of nearly 160 individuals representing over 65 local nonprofits [including Point Blue Conservation Science], RCDs and community groups, as well as state and federal agencies. Together, this group developed a set of short-term recovery and long-term strategies for watershed resiliency. The report, Living in a Fire-Adapted Landscape, was delivered to our Board in January, and will be a foundational document for the Natural Resources position in the County’s newly-formed Office of Recovery and Resiliency.

THE REPORT: Living in a fire-adapted landscape: Priorities for resiliency in Sonoma County’s natural and working lands (pdf) Jan 2018

Overall Priorities
1. Support landowners and land managers in assessing and mitigating watershed impacts from the 2017 North Bay fires.
2. Increase community awareness and preparedness for living in fire-prone landscapes.
3. Evaluate the response of natural and working lands to the fires to inform recovery, vegetation management, and fire-preparedness efforts.
4. Identify and implement practices – including land conservation, fuel-load
management – that maximize the resiliency of natural and working lands to
climate change and future disasters.
5. Ensure long-term attention to community and ecosystem resiliency through policy, long-term funding, and established working groups.
6. Permanently protect a network of lands that support biological diversity through changing climate conditions and prevent development in high risk areas.

View all articles

Comments are closed