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Tag Archive: flooding

  1. Flooding from high tides has doubled in the US in just 30 years; record levels of “sunny day” or nuisance flooding in 2017

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    • Shoreline communities may be inundated in the next two years as ocean levels rise amid serious climate change concerns
    • 2017 saw an average of six flooding days per area across 98 coastal areas monitored by NOAA – an all-time record

    by Oliver Milman June 6 2018 Read full Guardian UK article here

    The frequency of coastal flooding from high tides has doubled in the US in just 30 years, with communities near shorelines warned that the next two years are set to be punctuated by particularly severe inundations, as ocean levels continue to rise amid serious global climate change concerns.

    Last year there was an average of six flooding days per area across 98 coastal areas monitored by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – an all-time record. More than a quarter of these locations tied or broke their records for high tide flood days, the federal agency states in a new report.

    Known as “sunny day flooding”, these events swamp streets and homes with water simply from the incoming tide, without the aid of a storm. NOAA said that in 2017 areas across the US north-east and Gulf of Mexico were worst hit, with Boston, Massachusetts, and Atlantic City, New Jersey, both experiencing 22 days of flooding, while Galveston, in Texas, was soaked on 18 different days…

  2. Climate change projected to lead to bigger atmospheric rivers- 25% stronger and doubled frequency

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    • Findings project that the atmospheric rivers will be, on average, about 25 percent wider and longer, the global frequency of atmospheric river conditions — like heavy rain and strong winds — will increase by about 50 percent.
    • The frequency of the most intense atmospheric river storms is projected to nearly double.

    By Esprit Smith,NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory May 24, 2018 Read the full article here at NASA’s Vital Signs of the Planet Blog (with thanks to Maven’s Notebook)

    A new NASA-led study shows that climate change is likely to intensify extreme weather events known as atmospheric rivers across most of the globe by the end of this century, while slightly reducing their number.

    The new study projects atmospheric rivers will be significantly longer and wider than the ones we observe today, leading to more frequent atmospheric river conditions in affected areas.

    “The results project that in a scenario where greenhouse gas emissions continue at the current rate, there will be about 10 percent fewer atmospheric rivers globally by the end of the 21st century,” said the study’s lead author, Duane Waliser, of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. “However, because the findings project that the atmospheric rivers will be, on average, about 25 percent wider and longer, the global frequency of atmospheric river conditions — like heavy rain and strong winds — will actually increase by about 50 percent.”

    The results also show that the frequency of the most intense atmospheric river storms is projected to nearly double….

    Vicky Espinoza, Duane E. Waliser, Bin Guan, David A. Lavers, F. Martin Ralph. Global Analysis of Climate Change Projection Effects on Atmospheric Rivers. Geophysical Research Letters 19 April 2018 https://doi.org/10.1029/2017GL076968

     

  3. Most atolls will be uninhabitable by the mid-21st century because of sea-level rise exacerbating wave-driven flooding

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    • More than a thousand low-lying tropical islands risk becoming “uninhabitable” by the middle of the century — or possibly sooner — because of rising sea levels, upending the populations of some island nations and endangering key U.S. military assets, according to new research published Wednesday.

    ….The threats to the islands are twofold. In the long term, the rising seas threaten to inundate the islands entirely. More immediately, as seas rise, the islands will more frequently deal with large waves that crash farther onto the shore, contaminating their drinkable water supplies with ocean saltwater, according to the research.

    The islands face climate-change-driven threats to their water supplies “in the very near future,” according to the study, published in the journal Science Advances.

     ….The U.S. military supported the research in part to learn about the vulnerability of its tropical-island installations. The Pentagon base on Roi-Namur and surrounding islands supports about 1,250 American civilians, contractors and military personnel.

    ….The research was commissioned by the Pentagon’s Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program and published in a more lengthy form earlier this year, in a report that partly focused on helping the military identify sites where its assets could be vulnerable….

    Storlazzi, Curt D. et al. Most atolls will be uninhabitable by the mid-21st century because of sea-level rise exacerbating wave-driven flooding. Science Advances  25 Apr 2018:Vol. 4, no. 4,  eaap9741DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aap9741
  4. Dramatic increase in flooding on East Coast roads

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    • roads along the East Coast have experienced a 90 percent increase in flooding over the past 20 years

    March 28, 2018 University of New Hampshire read full ScienceDaily article here

    Researchers have found that in the past 20 years roads along the East Coast have experienced a 90 percent increase in flooding — often making the roads in these communities impassable, causing delays, as well as stress, and impacting transportation of goods and services.

    ….They estimate that this causes over 100 million hours of delays each year for drivers on those roads and that number could rise to more than 3.4 billion hours by 2100. By the middle of the century (2056 -2065), they predict nuisance flooding could occur almost daily at specific sites along the shores of Connecticut, New Jersey, Maryland, the District of Columbia, North Carolina, and Florida under an intermediate sea-level-rise scenario….

    Photo: Roads closed due to high tide floods in Portsmouth, N.H.
    Credit: Lisa Graichen/UNH

    Jennifer M. Jacobs, Lia R. Cattaneo, William Sweet, Theodore Mansfield. Recent and Future Outlooks for Nuisance Flooding Impacts on Roadways on the US East Coast. Transportation Research Record: The Journal of the Transportation Research Board, 2018; 036119811875636 DOI: 10.1177/0361198118756366

  5. Extreme Weather Will Occur More Frequently Worldwide Even if 2C Paris Target Met

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    • Even if we stay under 2C, extreme events -heat, floods, drought – will become more likely in the decades ahead. And if countries do not meet the Paris climate agreement goals, the risks will be even greater
    • Overall, up to 60% of locations across North America, Europe, East Asia and parts of southern South America would likely see at least a 3x and up to 5x increase in some areas increase in various extreme events, according to a Stanford study published yesterday in the journal Science Advances.
    • The country pledges to the Paris climate accord may put the world on track to warm by about 3 C, unless significantly greater climate action is promised—and soon.

    By Chelsea Harvey, ClimateWire on February 15, 2018 see full article here

    …the pledges world nations have submitted under the Paris Agreement are likely still not enough to keep global temperatures within the 2 C threshold envisioned by the accord. Experts suggest that the pledges may put the world on track to warm by about 3 C, unless significantly greater climate action is promised—and soon.

    In addition to not meeting the global temperature target, those commitments also imply substantial increase in the probability of record-setting events,” said Noah Diffenbaugh, a Stanford University climate researcher and the new study’s lead author. “Not only hot events but wet events, and also in other regions of the world, dry events as well.”…

    ….Heat records are likely to be among the most sensitive to future climate change. Record-breaking nighttime temperatures have already been increasing across 90 percent of the studied areas, the research suggests, and these records may increase by at least fivefold across half of Europe and a quarter of East Asia. Extreme wet events and milder cold spells are also expected to increase throughout the world, and extreme dry events will see an uptick in certain regions, mainly in the midlatitudes.

    Strengthening the Paris pledges could help significantly reduce the risks of extreme climate events, the new research suggests, although it warns that these events will still become more frequent in the future, even if temperature increases stay under 2 C.

    ….The findings, overall, carry a double warning. First, even with aggressive climate action, extreme climate events are likely to increase throughout much of the world—and human societies should brace themselves for that future, no matter what. But those mitigation efforts are still sorely needed, the research also suggests. Without them, the risks could be far more intense.

    Noah S. Diffenbaugh, Deepti Singh, and Justin S. Mankin. Unprecedented climate events: Historical changes, aspirational targets, and national commitments. Science Advances, 14 Feb 2018 DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aao3354

  6. How California’s record wildfire season paved the way for catastrophic mudslides

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  7. Adaptation now: River flood risks increase around the globe under future warming

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    • More than half of the United States needs to at least double their protection within the next two decades.
    • The increase in river flood risks over the next 2-3 decades will be driven by the amount of greenhouse-gases already emitted into the atmosphere

    January 10, 2018  Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) read full ScienceDaily article here

    Rainfall changes caused by global warming will increase river flood risks across the globe. Already today, fluvial floods are among the most common and devastating natural disasters. Scientists have now calculated the required increase in flood protection until the 2040s worldwide, breaking it down to single regions and cities. They find that the need for adaptation is greatest in the US, parts of India and Africa, Indonesia, and in Central Europe including Germany. Inaction would expose many millions of people to severe flooding.

    …”We have been surprised to find that even in developed countries with good infrastructure the need for adaptation is big,” says co-author Anders Levermann,

    ….An increase in river flood risks over the next 2-3 decades will be driven by the amount of greenhouse-gases already emitted into the atmosphere, hence it does not depend on whether or not we limit global warming.”
    However, it is clear that without limiting human-caused warming to well below 2 degrees Celsius, river flood risks in our century will increase in many regions to a level that we cannot adapt to,” says Levermann. “To keep people safe climate-change-induced risks must be taken seriously and money must be spent for adaptation. If we act now, we can protect against the risks of the next two decades. But further climate change must be limited by cutting greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuels to avoid risks that surpass our abilities to adapt.”…

    Sven N. Willner, Anders Levermann, Fang Zhao, Katja Frieler. Adaptation required to preserve future high-end river flood risk at present levels. Science Advances, 2018; 4 (1): eaao1914 DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aao1914

    Abstract: Earth’s surface temperature will continue to rise for another 20 to 30 years even with the strongest carbon emission reduction currently considered. The associated changes in rainfall patterns can result in an increased flood risk worldwide. We compute the required increase in flood protection to keep high-end fluvial flood risk at present levels. The analysis is carried out worldwide for subnational administrative units. Most of the United States, Central Europe, and Northeast and West Africa, as well as large parts of India and Indonesia, require the strongest adaptation effort. More than half of the United States needs to at least double their protection within the next two decades. Thus, the need for adaptation to increased river flood is a global problem affecting industrialized regions as much as developing countries.

  8. California: The Flood That Could Change Everything [must read esp. if you live in CA]

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    • California is spending billions to protect the millions at risk of a megaflood, but thanks to climate change, it’s too little too late.

    • California’s megaflood isn’t the stuff of fantasy flicks, it’s based on a 200-plus page piece of science that tested the limits of what was humanly possible in disaster prediction eight years ago known as the ARkStorm scenario… designed with an explicit purpose in mind: to objectively quantify and qualify the California’s threat of a coming flood that only a small group of niche scientists knew the bounds of at the time.
    • Climate change is increasing the chances that not only will these rare flood events become the norm in California, but that in the decades to come they could be even more intense than the one predicted here.

    By Eric Zerkel December 2017  read full Weather Channel article here

    ….The water will linger for days, weeks and in some places months. By the time it subsides the final toll will redefine the word catastrophe: More than $850 billion in damages (adjusted for inflation), more than four times costlier than Katrina, the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history. More than a million people forced to flee their homes in one of the largest evacuations in U.S. history, and many who return will return to nothing.

    This is California’s megaflood, a catastrophe not seen in a lifetime, but one scientists, disaster experts and officials know is coming in a warming world. No one knows when it will come, but it has happened in centuries past, and these are just some of its scientifically predicted and realistic impacts in modern day California. 

    Now climate change is increasing the chances that not only will these rare flood events become the norm in California, but that in the decades to come they could be even more intense than the one predicted here.

    California’s once-in-centuries catastrophe is no longer a future problem. Billions of dollars of local, state and federal action to bolster the state’s outdated flood protections have come too late and isn’t enough to protect the millions of Californians currently at risk of such an event and the millions more who will be at risk in the decades to come.

    Californians are playing climate catch-up in a state that’s ground zero for climate change’s future megafloods…..

    ….June’s water bond, the California Drought, Water, Parks, Climate, Coastal Protection, and Outdoor Access For All Act of 2018, calls for another $4 billion in bonds for statewide parks and water projects, but only $1.3 billion of that is allocated for water projects, and further, only $550 million of it is set aside specifically for flood protection and repair.

    Of that $550 million, $350 million is designated to the DWR for flood management in the Central Valley, including $50 million specifically set aside for levee repairs in the San Joaquin and Sacramento Deltas.

    Some $100 million is available for grants for “stormwater, mudslide, and other flash-flood-related protections” and another $100 million for grants for “multibenefit projects in urbanized areas to address flooding” statewide.

    But the bill’s primary goal is investment in parks, particularly in communities without access to parks, leaving flood protection as a footnote. The bill’s author, Kevin De León called it “the single largest investment in the history of the United States to park-starved communities.”

    The proposed November bond, drafted by the former deputy secretary of the state Natural Resources Agency, Jerry Meral, aims to be “complementary” to the June ballot measure and “make sure that no critical problem was totally ignored,” filling in some of the gaps of flood protection funding from the June bond.  …

    The Flood That Could Change Everything

    Source: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, California Department of Water Resources (2013)

    The Flood That Could Change Everything

     

    The Flood That Could Change EverythingThis January 1862 photo shows floodwaters along K Street looking west from 4th street in Sacramento after the Great Flood of 1861-62. (California State Library, DWR)

    The Flood That Could Change Everything

    Changing Climate, Changing Floods

    Climate change’s expected increase in temperatures and extreme precipitation will combine to produce more epic floods in California. This graphic shows how warmer temperatures will melt snowpack quicker and dump more rain and less snow on mountain ranges, leading to more prolific floods. Source: California Department of Water Resources 2017

    The Flood That Could Change Everything

    One of the 23,000 homes flooded during the 1997 floods in California. (Norm Hughes/California Department of Water Resources)

  9. Timing is key in keeping organic matter in wet cropland soils, new study finds

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    • Periodically flooded soils may actually lose organic matter at accelerated rate, a new report suggests.

    November 24, 2017 Iowa State University read full ScienceDaily article here

    ..The study found that timing plays a key role in how well wet soils retain organic matter. While soils with consistently high moisture content do retain organic matter over the long term, soils may actually lose organic matter during shorter spans of flooding. The findings have implications for agricultural fields that are poorly drained or flood for a few weeks of the year before drying out, Hall said. The study also shows that wetlands, thought of as a useful tool for conservation and carbon sequestration, may require consistent flooding to realize environmental benefits from organic matter accumulation….

    …”We found that periodically wet soils don’t necessarily protect organic matter from decomposition and may lead to losses, at least over a timescale of weeks to months,” he said.

    The study drew on research conducted in an ISU laboratory. The researchers took soil samples from a central Iowa cornfield and subjected the sample to various conditions before conducting chemical analyses.

    Hall said future research should widen in scope and include field experiments as well as laboratory-based work. He said he wants to test how various drainage techniques influence organic matter loss as well as pinpoint the length of time required for wet soil to realize environmental benefits….

    Wenjuan Huang, Steven J. Hall. Elevated moisture stimulates carbon loss from mineral soils by releasing protected organic matter. Nature Communications, 2017; 8 (1) DOI: 10.1038/s41467-017-01998-z

  10. A massive storm flooded Houston. Experts say California’s state capital could be next.

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    • Sacramento is more vulnerable to catastrophic flooding than any other major city in the United States except New Orleans, according to federal officials, a threat created by the city’s sunken geography.

    October 29 2017 see full Washington Post article here

    …Models show a levee failure could submerge parts of this inland metropolis [Sacramento] under as much as 20 feet of water. As Northern Californians are recovering from wildfires and sifting through homes reduced to ash, officials in the state’s capital are struggling to prevent another type of natural disaster….

    …Levees and other flood defenses here and in the surrounding Central Valley have amassed up to $21 billion in needed repairs and upgrades, while Sacramento’s population has continued to grow. Just days before Hurricane Harvey slammed into Texas and flooded Houston, a report from the California Department of Water Resources warned that “many flood facilities” in the Central Valley “face an unacceptably high chance of failure.”…

    ….If a levee were to break along the American River, which empties into the Sacramento River near downtown, water would start flowing into the city.

    Although floodgates could be quickly deployed to protect downtown Sacramento from a life-threatening deluge, the water would eventually seep in from other directions, covering much of the area in several feet of water, said Roger Ince, a Sacramento emergency coordinator.

    The water would continue flowing south and deposit more than 20 feet of water in the Pocket neighborhood, where about 20,000 people live in one- and two-story homes….

    ….In a 2010 report called “Overview of the ARkStorm Scenario,” more than two dozen scientists concluded that two back-to-back storms of similar strength could slam into California and submerge 25 percent of the state underwater.

    “This isn’t science fiction,” said one of the authors, Keith Porter, a research professor at the University of Colorado at Boulder. “It’s a very realistic scenario, and it could happen at any time.”

    Jeffrey Mount, a senior fellow and water resources specialist at the Public Policy Institute of California, said such projections raise serious questions about continued development in California’s flood plain, a debate that has been playing out in Sacramento’s Natomas neighborhood, where thousands of new homes are planned…