Spring Tides Reveal Intertidal Treasures

We’re not referring to the season spring, but a ‘spring tide.’ This is a term referring to the periods of higher high and lower low tides during new and full moon. There is some really cool stuff in our intertidal!

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Did Somebody Say Sperm Whale?

On the morning of February 2nd, the winter Farallon crew woke up to find quite a surprise… an immature sperm whale had washed ashore on Mirounga Beach!
Warning: There are graphic images in this post containing a deceased animal.

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Peak of the E-Seal season: brawling bulls, caring cows, plump pups, and more!

Things are heating up for the winter Farallon crew, the Elephant Seal breeding season is at its peak!

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It’s been a windy one

Yesterday on the Farallones: “It’s a heck of a lot easier to walk north!”

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Cricket Time!

What lurks in the the caves on the Farallones? We survey them to find out! It’s time once again for our quarterly cricket surveys!

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Glowing Sea Gherkins!

On the morning of January 7th, the field team stumbled across a curious sight to behold… thousands of tubular gelatinous creatures!

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What the rains bring…

Exploring the interaction of annual precipitation trends on SEFI with one of our very special island critters!

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Happy Holidays from the Farallones!

The e-seals and the Farallones e-seal team wish you the best this holiday season!

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First Elephant Seal Pup & Team Introductions

Learn more about this year’s winter crew, the first pup of the season, and how we track untagged seals from year to year on the Farallones!

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The Hidden Life of the Farallon Facilities

There are many challenges to living and working on a remote field station. Not the least of which is a constant battle to maintain infrastructure in a rough marine environment. It takes tireless effort and dedication of staff biologists, USFWS personnel, and numerous contractors and collaborators. Read on to learn a bit more about the work done behind the scenes to the keep these remote island facilities running.

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